A DON’T-MISS WEBINAR: Using Data Visualization to Tell Your Story

From Salesforce to Hewlett-Packard, The Presentation Company’s Janine Kurnoff has taught some of the world’s biggest brands how to tell more compelling stories through data visualization. After taking a break to care for her newest (and cutest) data wizard Baby Liam, Janine is ready to put on her training hat once again and provide the opportunity to learn her time-tested techniques that will take your data storytelling to entirely new levels.

During a free live WebEx webinar on October 25, we explored including some best practices, including:

  • How to tell a story with data that can be understood in a glance;
  • Clever visual tricks to think “outside the chart” using photography, icons eye-catching text and other visual effects;
  • How to dodge the most common pitfalls with charts and graphs.

Couldn’t make the live session? Watch the WebEx recording by clicking here and entering the password “Webextpc25”. Or, catch some key highlights and takeaways below!

Step 1: Determine Your Story First

There is no understating how important it is to craft your story first. When we are sitting on mounds of data, our inclination is to immediately get charting. After all, doesn’t our data contain all the evidence we need? Doesn’t our data speak for itself? No, it doesn’t. And if you do present your data upfront, without critical analysis and an idea of the story you want to tell, it’s value will evaporate.

Step 2: Write Headlines that Report the News

Insights that you glean from data amount to more than just facts. It helps to see the charts, tables, or graphics you put on each slide as a news story. And doesn’t every news story need a headline? Writing headlines forces you to clearly display your most important data insights. You’ve already determined your story (step 1), so this is kind of like coming up with the chapter headings. And each of these headings must move along the story.

Step 2: Write Headlines that Report the News

Insights that you glean from data amount to more than just facts. It helps to see the charts, tables, or graphics you put on each slide as a news story. And doesn’t every news story need a headline? Writing headlines forces you to clearly display your most important data insights. You’ve already determined your story (step 1), so this is kind of like coming up with the chapter headings. And each of these headings must move along the story.

Generic heading
Heading that reports the news

Step 3: Use callouts to highlight important data insights

Now that you’ve determined your story and created bold news headlines, it’s time to get down to the details of data visualization. We love callouts because they are one of the easiest ways to draw attention to your most important data. During the webinar, we’ll dive into the details about how using color, shapes, and sizes will give your data impact.

No callouts
Callouts identify critical information

Step 4: Get rid of the noise!

Visually, you are doing your audience a huge favor if you minimize or delete any clutter on your slide. Start with any chart labels. Only include labels that are concise, necessary, and informative. Do they make your data easy to read? Are axis labels easy to understand? Do they make sense with the story you are trying to tell?       

Axis labels are unabbreviaited; chart uses heavy gridlines and vertical axis
Axis labels are abbreviated; amount of gridlines has been reduced

Missed any of the previous webinars hosted by Cisco WebEx and The Presentation Company?

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Interview with an Online Training Expert

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 8.39.12 PMAt one of the 439 holiday events we hosted at our home this year (yes, it was that year… I don’t even remember most of it) my globe-trotting brother-in-law and I discovered some common ground: online training with WebEx.

He’s a corporate training gray hair, the kind of guy who can map out a massive organization’s “talent journey” without breaking a sweat, and then deliver the soft skills needed to move folks along it so delightfully that they think they just watched a series of TED talks. What’s a “talent journey,” you ask? I asked too.

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